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Saturday, May 28, 2011

Soto Muka Stove (OD-1NP) -- Video Review

I've put together a video review on the new Soto Muka Stove (OD-1NP).   Soto clearly put a lot of time and effort into this new stove, and they've come out with a really nice product.  Have a look:



Interestingly, in Japan, the Muka is known as the SOD-371 whereas the stove is known as the OD-1NP in the United States. "Sod" has negative connotations in British English, so perhaps Soto decided to drop the "S" from their designator's prefix. I have no idea why they changed the number of the stove.

COLD WEATHER ADVISORY
I do have one fairly significant concern about the stove.  The directions say that the stove should not be used in temperatures below -4F/-20C due to possible fuel leakage issues.  If you like to do winter backpacking or mountaineering, consider carefully what temperatures you may be faced with before you decide to use a Muka.

Overall, the Soto Muka is a very nice stove, but do make sure to stay within its recommended temperature range.

HJ

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10 comments:

  1. Jim
    What a fantastic blog, really in depth reviewing
    Good work Fella
    SBW

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  2. Thanks, bro. Glad it was useful.

    HJ

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  3. I gave the folks on BCUK a heads up about your blog
    SBW

    ReplyDelete
  4. Thanks very much. Bushcrafters always welcome.

    I've put up two new posts this week. Have a look if you like. Questions and comments always welcomed.

    HJ

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  5. Jim I followed you from Spiritburner website and have to say I really really enjoy your reviews and in depth commentary on small details of what can seriously help on a decision about a purchase of a particular stove. Also how you explain how one stove may be good for one person or situation and maybe not another. Curious to know if and when you may do some not neccessararly review but a blog post about some of the old time spirit burner type stoves. You know the oldies but goodies so to speak like a Optimus 96 or maybe a 199 or hiker 111 and the types of burners. As your commentary is really good in your videos, There are videos on these old stoves but they have little commentary on the stoves. So I think you would do a great job on the subject. Thanks new fan of you site.

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  6. Hi, Viscara,

    Thanks for your feedback on my style. I've got a lot of classic stoves. I just need time to do the blogging! Stay tuned. Eventually, I will do a lot of classics. The Svea 123, Primus 71, and Optimus 111 rank high on my list as does the Primus 96. I don't have a 199, but would love to get one. Too blasted expensive. I'd also like a 111T, but again to expensive.

    HJ

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  7. You are so right about those 2 stoves. I seen them going for 300 and up! and some of those still need work done to them. I had a chance to get a 8R a while back on craigslist for a mere 40 bucks and just didnt get to San Francisco to go pick it up. Now I am kicking myself as that stoves now sells for 150 and up. I used to own the 123 not the 123R that I got for a steal at a garage sale for a mere 22 dollars. Somehow it grew legs "Roomates" and it disappeared. So I been on a hunt for another stove like the 8R. After the a few videos on the Soto Muko I have to say that is one nice "Clean" burning stove. I really am liking that Muko stove because of that reason. Well keep up the good work on your blog many out there enjoy your "Stovie" blog posts. Oh maybe a Swiss Volcano review may be good too. They got them at dirtcheap.com for a mere 10.00 bucks.

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  8. Lol. So many stoves, so little time.

    I'll do as many as I can.

    HJ

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  9. Jim,
    I would think you would have put the pad under the fuel container, not the aluminum disc. When I use a canister, it works better if it is not right on the snow so I put the canister on my pad. Does it not matter if you are using liquid fuel (white gas)?

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    Replies
    1. Paul,

      The purpose of the pad is to keep the snow from melting down into the snow. You are correct that you should insulate a canister of gas from the snow, but you should also put something under the stove itself (if the stove is separate from the canister) so the stove won't melt in.

      And, as you guessed, it doesn't really matter if a liquid fueled stove has it's fuel bottle on the snow. Vaporization occurs at the burner, not in the fuel bottle, therefore the temperature of the fuel bottle isn't a major factor in how the stove operates.

      HJ

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