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Friday, May 13, 2011

(Gas) Stoves for Cold Weather II

Here's another article on gas stoves for cold weather. To me, this is an important article. This article discusses what type of canister gas stoves can be used in weather down to 0°F/-18°C. Yes, you read that correctly, down to 0°F/-18°C.  Now, before you read this article, you need to understand the basics of cold weather canister gas stove operation.   If you combine the techniques from the basics of cold weather canister gas stove operation with the type of stove discussed in my article, then you really can operate a canister gas stove down to 0°F/-18°C.

Click the photo:
An MSR Rapidfire Stove (a remote style canister gas stove)
Or click this link:
(Gas) Stoves for Cold Weather II

HJ


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7 comments:

  1. Hi, Jim!
    Please, help me to understand the cold weather process better.
    So, the weather too cold. Like -15C. Only propane evaporates. While the canister is upside down, propane vaporization pushes the liquefied gas out to the stove. Right? Are there another forces,that deliver liquefied gas to the stove?
    And what if propane ended? Maybe, burn out while priming the stove. The gas won't come out from the stove then?

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  2. Anton,

    Actually, the propane blends with whatever it is mixed with to form in essence a new fuel. The combined fuel has a vaporization point between the two vaporization points of the fuels that were blended.

    In upright operation, the propane comes out of the blend at a faster rate, leaving one with a poor performing fuel for cold weather. With the canister upside down, the propane does not come out of the blend, the blend stays consistent throughout the life of the canister, and performance stays good.

    Yes, if the propane were exhausted, you would lose pressure and be unable to operate your stove if the other fuel were too cold.

    HJ

    ReplyDelete
  3. Thanks for your answer, Jim.

    And now I've got more questions.

    Let's do it again with the canister upside down. What does push the gas out of it in the cold weather? Blended gas vaporization, that creates pressure above the liquefied gas?
    Then if temp is lower than blended gas boil temp, will propane still evaporate and push other gas out?

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  4. Yes, the blended gas vaporizes which pressurizes the canister.

    If you are below the boiling point of the blend, you will not have pressure.

    HJ

    ReplyDelete
  5. I see.
    Do u know any method to calculate gas mix boiling temperature, if the boiling temperature and percentage of every ingredient is known?

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  6. Yes. How's your calculus? Based on the percentages and the net weight, you must compute the molar fraction. Once you know the fraction in terms of molecules of each substance, you then have to apply several formulae which computes something like a weighted average. It is not trivial. Even though I understand the computation in general terms, I don't have the mathematical knowledge to make the computations any more. If you have any friends that are physicists or engineers, they may be able to help you.

    HJ

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  7. Ok, I'll ask them to help.
    Thanks again!
    I found your blog very informative and interesting!

    ReplyDelete