QuietStove.com

Wednesday, February 29, 2012

MSR Espresso Star

So, say you like your morning espresso (yum!).  :)  But that little tiny backpacking espresso maker just falls between the pot supports on your stove.  :(  What to do?

Well, let's take the example of the MSR Whisperlite.  With a Whisperlite, it's really no problem if you've got an MSR Espresso Star.
An MSR Espresso Star
Just lay the Espresso Star across your pot supports, and you're good to go.
An MSR Espresso Star on a Whisperlite Universal
Of course, there are other stoves besides a Whisperlite that have pot supports that might be a bit wide for a little espresso maker.  So, I thought I'd try it on another stove.  Here's the MSR Espresso Star on a Primus Omnifuel.
An MSR Espresso Star on a Primus Omnifuel
Obviously, I haven't exhaustively checked every possible stove out there, but if you've got a three legged stove where the legs are evenly spaced (120 degree angles), radiating outward from a central point, then the MSR Espresso Star will most likely work.

Now the bad news:  These are now available second hand only (eBay, Craig's List, etc).  The MSR Espresso Star is a nifty little gadget, but apparently it didn't sell well enough to be retained in MSR's product line up.  Having struggled with jury rigging an espresso maker on my winter stove, I was delighted to find one on Craig's List.  Search, and you might be able to pick one up too.

Thanks for joining me on another Adventure in Stoving,

HJ

Technical Appendix -- Weights
MSR Espresso Star . . . .  19g/0.67oz

The MSR Espresso Star

15 comments:

  1. That looks very useful, what espresso maker do you use?

    My espresso maker is neither small or light, and I'm looking for something more appropriate for hiking.

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    Replies
    1. Hi, Jim,

      I'm using a GSI mini espresso maker: http://www.rei.com/product/401117/gsi-outdoors-mini-expresso-maker-1-cup

      HJ

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  2. Thanks, Jim

    That GSI coffee maker looks pretty nifty. Bit on the heavy side, though. I have been settling for 'cowboy coffee', putting the ground coffee into the pot, letting it settle, then pouring through a tea strainer.

    Andrew

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  3. Hi, Andrew,

    Yes, it is a bit heavy, but it does make nice cup of espresso! Normally, we only take it on shorter, easier trips. For serious trips, we just go with instant coffee.

    HJ

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  4. Hi from Australia

    This si just what I am looking for. I can not believe they no longer stock it. I mean it probably cost them 30 cents to make so what cost was it to them really, make the stove stock the parts for when they may be needed. On saying that I am now going to make some of these in the garage and flick them off. I am sure that it will not be at all difficult to make. Thanks for posting because it is exactly what I need. I always take the stove top esp when in NZ and doing long alpine trips, the coffee hit in the morning really gives you the start you need. Phil

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    Replies
    1. Hi, Philip,

      Glad it's helpful. Much of what I try to do with my blog is to show people what's out there. The design is simplicity itself. I'm sure there's a way to replicate it.

      Alternatively, you could take some wire "gauze" of the type used in a laboratory with a bunsen burner and lay that across your burner. Should work reasonably well.

      Regards,

      HJ

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  5. Came across this, the other day: . Even heavier than the espresso star, but readily available and designed to fit the Trangia stove system. According to the comments, it fits the Trangia package with a little modding, is actually a bit lighter than indicated (74g vs. 104g) and will work fine on other stoves like the MSR Whisperlite (and thus, presumably, on just about any stove with three pot supports).

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  6. It doesn't appear as though your link showed up. Sounds like an interesting product though.

    HJ

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    Replies
    1. Let me try that again, then: http://www.globetrotter.de/de/shop/detail.php?mod_nr=121956

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    2. BTW, cutting up a "dollar store" wire pot stand is a much cheaper solution: http://www.outdoorseiten.net/forum/showthread.php?44781-Kocherstern-f%FCr-Trangia

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    3. Thank you for the link(s). Even at 74g it's a bit heavy, almost four times the weight of the Espresso Star. Looks like a good product, though.

      The wire cut out looks cheap and practical! And I think it would be reasonably light. I like that option very much.

      HJ

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  7. Wow, wish this was still available! Wonder how well it would work on a Trangia with a Clickstand.

    The "espresso maker"* I've been making is an Esbit model, the Kaffeemaschine. It uses a self contained stove/stand and burns Esbit tablets (obviously). Not a bad gadget.
    http://urbanadventureleague.blogspot.com/2012/04/camping-gear-corner-esbit-coffee-maker.html
    http://urbanadventureleague.blogspot.com/2012/09/review-revisited-esbit-coffee-maker.html

    *I put "espresso maker" in quotes because no stovetop unit makes true espresso. True espresso needs to be extracted at a pressure of 9 Bar, where a stovetop unit will only get up to 1.5 Bar. It'll make a strong, espresso-like coffee, but it's not the real thing. Yep, I'm a coffee nerd.

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    Replies
    1. I don't think the Espresso Star would work with a Clikstand. The Espresso Star needs pot supports that radiate outward from the burner head which a Clikstand doesn't have.

      HJ

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  8. Obviously I am around five years late to this discussion but I like to consider myself an amateur espresso aficionado.

    I also love to be in the middle of nowhere.
    This creates an issue for me. I've found two reasonable options to combat my morning caffeine withdrawals.

    IMUSA makes TINY espresso percolators. By tiny I do mean small in size but heavy in weight. The smallest I have is one shot/demitasse and I purchased a double for my mother to use in her Scotty. I take it on regular "camping" trips.

    Now when backpacking I take instant "espresso" by Cafe Bustelo for a higher caffeine content and stronger taste/buzz than just Folgers. Of course this isn't anything like what I make at home with crema and through my pump driven machine etc. However I'm out here roughing it.

    Another thing I'm trying to learn is how to use my titanium mug to make a close version of Turkish coffee. I have a hard enough time with my ibrisk soooo yeah.

    But it seems a bit more of a coffee and outdoor lovers "meet in the middle" than espresso.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, Lisa,

      It's never too late for good coffee!

      Hey, have you seen the Aerobie Aero Press? I haven't tried it, but it's like $30, and I think it's the lightest option out there for espresso on the trail. Check out this article which mentions it: http://www.thegearcaster.com/2013/05/the-great-backcountry-coffee-off.html.

      HJ

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